Anxiety Chronic Pain Depression Ketamine PTSD

How Does Ketamine Infusion Therapy Work?

People who suffer from mood disorders such as depression, anxiety, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), along with nerve-based chronic pain conditions, know all-too-well that physical and psychological discomfort is oftentimes hard to manage. Traditional treatment options sometimes work poorly, if at all, and many people are turning to a new kind of treatment – ketamine infusions

WHAT IS KETAMINE?

Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic that has some hallucinogenic effects. It distorts perceptions of sight and sound and makes the user feel disconnected and not in control. It is an injectable, short-acting anesthetic for use in humans and animals. It is referred to as a ‘dissociative anesthetic’ because it makes patients feel detached from their pain and environment.” Created as an anesthetic in the 1960s, ketamine became famous for successfully treating wounded U.S. soldiers in Vietnam.

HOW DOES KETAMINE WORK FOR DEPRESSION?

For people experiencing symptoms of mental illness, chronic pain, or other disorders, research has shown that a neurotransmitter in the brain called glutamate may be weakened, damaged, or not working correctly leading to depression, for instance. Neurotransmitters are responsible for sending signals between cells, influencing how pain is perceived physically and mentally. Low doses of ketamine have been shown to repair or strengthen damaged neurotransmitters, making it easier for a person to handle depression symptoms. 

HOW DOES KETAMINE INFUSION THERAPY WORK?

Ketamine has been proven effective in treating symptoms of mental illness and shows promise in reducing discomfort from arthritis and nerve-based chronic pain conditions. Since the early 1960s when it was created for pre-surgical anesthesia, ketamine has largely been administered intravenously. Today, ketamine infusion therapy works the same way – dispensed through a tube intravenously, but in lower doses than what is typically needed to sedate a person for surgery.

How does ketamine work? 

Ketamine can sometimes go to work right away to provide relief. Feeling better quickly, and improving moods is its key benefit. When administered in a controlled setting, it kicks off a series of events in your brain that rejuvenates damaged neurons.

Will I need regular ketamine therapy? 

Ketamine has a high success rate in treating symptoms of mood disorders and various pain conditions, but because it is not a cure for the conditions it treats, this is considered an ongoing treatment process where periodic infusions are still required after the initial series of infusions are completed.

Are there potential side effects? 

As with any medication, there’s a risk of negative side effects when ketamine is administered intravenously. It can result in side effects including increased blood pressure and heart rate, anxiety, dizziness, double vision, seizures, vomiting, slowed breathing, and others. These side effects are very rare with low-dose ketamine infusions and any increases in blood pressure and heart rate typically return to baseline ranges within 20 minutes of the infusion being completed.

ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT OPTIONS

Many people who suffer from mental illnesses like depression, seasonal anxiety disorder, postpartum depression, chronic pain, or sleep conditions like neck pain or insomnia, may benefit from non-traditional therapy to lessen their symptoms. There’s no magic answer when it comes to reducing pain, and the first step along the path of managing discomfort is getting diagnosed by a healthcare provider. 

Once diagnosed, your provider may recommend one or a combination of therapeutic treatments including:

  • Ketamine therapy.
  • Eliminating or reducing caffeine from your diet, particularly in the form of caffeinated soda or coffee beverages.
  • Eating healthier meals, including food rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruits, beans, fish, and lean meats. Foods containing omega-3 fatty acids, folate, and vitamin B12 should also be part of your meal plan.
  • Light exercise including regular walks.
  • Meditation, yoga, or tai chi.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Many kinds of physical and psychological pain can be managed with psychotherapy, medicine, or holistic therapy. In some cases, physical therapy or surgery may be required. But if you’ve experienced pain that resists such treatment, ask your healthcare provider about the benefits of ketamine infusion therapy. Ketamine was once used solely as an anesthetic, but it has proven effective in treating the symptoms of mental illness and other pain conditions. 

Contact us today to learn more about these innovative new treatment options.

Chronic Pain

What Is The Definition of Chronic Pain Syndrome?

Pain is a normal part of human life – it is your body’s way of warning you that something is wrong. In most cases, your body heals and you stop hurting. For others, however, this pain continues long after you have healed and is more intense. This is known as chronic pain.

Approximately one in four people (25%) with chronic pain suffer from a condition called Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). This is a condition that has symptoms more than just chronic pain, including depression and anxiety – symptoms that will interfere greatly in a person’s everyday life.

Although the symptoms can be debilitating, there is hope for relief thanks to treatments like counseling, physical therapy, medications, and ketamine infusions.

Causes

  • Arthritis
  • Joint problems
  • Back pain
  • Headaches
  • Muscle strains
  • Repetitive stress injuries
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Nerve damage
  • Lyme disease
  • Broken bones
  • Cancer
  • Acid reflux
  • Ulcers
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Endometriosis
  • Surgery

Risk Factors

Anyone can develop chronic pain, although some factors can make a person more at risk, including the following:

  • Injury
  • Surgery
  • Obesity

Treatment for Chronic Pain

The treatment of chronic pain aims chiefly to reduce pain enough to allow you to carry out your everyday activities once again.

CRPS has no known cure, and treatment plans must be adjusted according to each individual.

In some cases, over-the-counter medications, like acetaminophen or ibuprofen, can help reduce the symptoms of chronic pain. Some people find relief with opioid pain relievers, but the side effects can be harmful when abused.

There are also some general lifestyle changes and home remedies you can participate in to help ease the symptoms, such as engaging in physical therapy or yoga, seeing a therapist, or practicing meditation.

Ketamine for Chronic Pain Treatment

Ketamine was first approved by the FDA for use as an anesthetic, but it has also found significant use as a pain reliever over the years, with many organizations now recommending it for the treatment of chronic pain conditions.

Research into ketamine infusions for treating pain is still ongoing, but it is generally believed that ketamine helps to foster connections between synapses and restore damaged nerve connections, essentially “rewiring” the brain. Ketamine infusions may be particularly effective at not only treating the pain symptoms of Chronic Pain Syndrome, but also the additional depression and anxiety symptoms.

The recent FDA approval of Spravato (a ketamine-based nasal spray for treatment-resistant depression), as well as the development of new psychedelics research centers by John Hopkins, may indicate a shift in the chronic pain treatment industry, providing innovative new options like ketamine infusion to those who experience persistent and treatment-resistant chronic pain.

Chronic Pain

CRPS Types 1 And 2 and How You Can Find Treatment

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic neuro-inflammatory disorder that typically affects one specific limb after an injury, believed to be caused by damage to the nervous system. The pain is usually out of proportion when compared to the initial injury. Often, the initial energy is a musculoskeletal or nerve injury.

CRPS is uncommon and still not completely understood by science, but treatment can be effective when started early on. As many as 200,000 individuals experience this condition in the United States every year.

Research has proven time and time again that although CRPS is a physical disorder, it has not been unheard of for medical professionals to suggest that patients with CRPS are exaggerating their pain for psychological reasons.

What are the symptoms of CRPS?

The most consistent symptom is constant, severe pain often described as a burning or “pins and needles” sensation throughout the affected limb. In some cases, the pain has been known to spread across the entire limb, even if the initial injury only affected a finger or a toe. The affected area may experience allodynia, which means that normal contact with the skin can be very painful.

Other symptoms may include:

  • Sensitivity to cold
  • Swelling of the affected area
  • Changes in skin temperature, color, or texture
  • Joint swelling or stiffness
  • Muscle spasms or tremors

Symptoms have been known to change over time and often vary from person to person. In rare cases, CRPS may even spread from the affected area to elsewhere in your body.

What are the causes of CRPS?

While the exact causes are still not entirely understood, in more than 90 percent of cases of CRPS the condition is triggered by a history of trauma or injury. These triggers include fractures, sprains, soft tissue injury, limb immobilization, surgery, or sometimes even a minor medical procedure such as a needle stick.

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